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Sleep Health

Leading doctors and researchers don’t agree on much, but they do agree on this one thing: getting a good night of sleep is one of the most important things you can do for your health.

Despite sleep’s critical importance to your wellbeing, the specifics of it are a mystery to many. If you’re like most people, you’re wondering what’s going on in your body when the lights go out. 

In this section we explore topics ranging from how psychoactive substances affect sleep to how our sleep patterns change due to pregnancy, behavior, habits, and seasons; all the way to how neurodegenerative diseases, stress, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, ADHD and other diseases are related to sleep.

If you have any questions about how to get a healthier night of sleep then we have the answers.

What you should know about diseases, addictions and sleep

Do illnesses cause poor sleep or does poor sleep cause illnesses? The truth is it can be both ways. Sometimes undesirable behavior and stress cause long-lasting poor sleep which can backfire through a development of a disease or a disorder. Sometimes it’s the disease that prevents someone from having good restorative sleep.

How does substance abuse cause sleep problems?

Alcohol and many drugs are known to prevent us from reaching deep sleep which is extremely important for the body’s restoration and brain’s ‘maintenance’. Although some substances may make us sleepier that doesn’t mean they will give us quality sleep.

For example, marijuana used as a sleep aid can make you fall asleep faster but will deprive you of REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. It’s not only the vivid dreams that you will lose but also a good part of your memory consolidation and emotional stabilization, both of which occur during REM.

What diseases can be caused by poor sleep?

Poor sleep has been associated with numerous diseases including obesity, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, heart disease, and sleep disorders.

  • Diabetes. If you cut back on sleep or sleep with a light on, your insulin resistance becomes similar to that of a prediabetic person even if you are skinny. It is believed that chronic insufficient or poor sleep can lead to weight increase because our body doesn’t metabolize food well and on top of that, sleep-deprived people tend to eat a lot more than they need. These factors may result in the development of diabetes.
  • Alzheimer’s. Your brain gets cleared out of certain substances every night – these substances naturally appear as a product of nerve cell activity. When you don’t have enough sleep you don’t allow your brain to clear them out from the system. Doctors call these substances ‘neurotoxins’ when they build up so much that they start hurting or killing brain cells. This dangerous state is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. In order to have a fast and smart brain – make sure you have plenty of sleep.
  • Heart problems. Your body relaxes and blood pressure decreases while you sleep. Insufficient sleep keeps stress levels and blood pressure high. Research shows that both men and women can suffer from heart diseases after years of inadequate sleep.
  • Sleep disorders. Not sleeping well due to work, stress, or simply out of (bad) habit is likely to cause other sleep problems – sleep paralysis, sleepwalking, or even narcolepsy (when a person randomly falls asleep). Well-rested, stress-free people rarely have any of these. Poor sleep can also cause  insomnia (difficulty falling or staying asleep) – which means that if you’ve deprived yourself of sleep for a long time you might find yourself unable to sleep when you want to. This could be due to high levels of stress hormones and a complete confusion of your internal biological clock.

Sleep and Fertility

Sleeping well could increase your chances of conceiving. Although it’s not the only factor, sleep certainly plays a role in fertility; both male and female reproductive functioning gets better on sufficient sleep as hormones are balanced better and all organs work properly.  Other factors that play a large role in… Read More »Sleep and Fertility

Sleeping Pills and Sleep

Sleeping pills are often used as a quick fix for a sleepless night but many Americans use them for much longer than advised. Pills mainly work by causing drowsiness and “knocking us out” until the morning comes. However, we won’t always wake up refreshed – especially if we take them… Read More »Sleeping Pills and Sleep

Dementia and Sleep Disorders

Dementia is not an uncommon problem among the elderly. It can occur as a symptom of a number of diseases, like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, and is usually progressive. People with dementia often suffer from one or more sleep disorders which further aggravate their state. Fortunately sleep problems can be addressed… Read More »Dementia and Sleep Disorders

Sleeping With Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is a type of mental illness. Scientists believe it occurs after traumatic events or as a genetic problem. People with bipolar disorder have periods of mania (extremely active, indulging in pleasurable activities, sometimes not sleeping for days) followed by periods of depression (continuous sadness, hopelessness, lack of activity).… Read More »Sleeping With Bipolar Disorder

Sleep and Dopamine

Overview Dopamine is frequently associated with positive emotions and a feeling of euphoria. However, researchers have discovered other interesting functions of dopamine – for example, its role in adverse events, where it carries out an important task in helping learn how to avoid negative situations. Dopamine can be used to… Read More »Sleep and Dopamine