Insufficient Sleep Syndrome

Last updated: May 20, 2019

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The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Read our full medical disclaimer.

Insufficient sleep syndrome is a voluntary sleep disorder and is a type of hypersomnia. This means that this disorder is a result of unintentional actions by the patient. It affects nearly 30 percent of adults.

This disorder stems from getting less than 6 hours of sleep per night. According to research, people nowadays sleep 25 percent less than those who lived a century ago. The decrease in sleeping time may be a result of the quality of modern life. We spend most of our time working, socializing or engaging in sports instead of getting enough sleep. Although these activities may improve one’s social life, they can severely impact the quality and quantity of their sleep.

Most of the time those who suffer from this disorder fail to recognize their symptoms. Unlike other sleep disorders, Insufficient Sleep Syndrome is not a result of other factors. It is also not a result of other sleep disorders.

What are the symptoms of Insufficient Sleep Syndrome?

Symptoms of this disorder include:

  • Regularly sleeping for less than 6 hours per night
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Low energy levels
  • Reduced alertness
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle weakness
  • Lack of concentration
  • Attention deficit
  • Lack of focus
  • Irritability
  • Mood and behavioral changes

Who are at risk of this disorder?

This sleep disorder is more common for young adults and middle-aged individuals. These include individuals between the ages of 25 to 35. The risk of this disorder decreases with aging. It is also more common in women than in men. Individuals who work in graveyard shifts are also at risk. This sleep disorder is also more common for individuals who work more than 40 hours per week.

Why are the dangers of Insufficient Sleep Syndrome?

People who have this disorder are often chronically fatigued. They are also prone to excessive daytime sleepiness. This means that they have an increased likelihood of having accidents at work or while driving. Due to the lack of focus and concentration associated with this disorder, it can also lead to a decrease in the quality of performance at school or at work. Having this disorder also increases the likelihood of obesity and diabetes.

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How is this disorder treated?

Since this is a voluntary sleep disorder the treatment is simply getting enough sleep. A person with this disorder should practice sleep hygiene. This will allow him to get better quality sleep. Good sleep hygiene includes creating an environment that is conducive to sleep. It should also include avoiding foods and beverages that can disrupt sleep.

The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. Read our full medical disclaimer.

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